Thursday, 25 October 2012

Crown Capital Management: The Great Renewable Energy Scam: Is There A Change...

Crown Capital Management: The Great Renewable Energy Scam: Is There A Change...: http://www.forbes.com/sites/patrickmichaels/2012/01/19/the-great-renewable-energy-scam-is-there-a-change-in-the-wind/ People don’t like ...

The Great Renewable Energy Scam: Is There A Change In The Wind? - The-looser-it-s-me

The Great Renewable Energy Scam: Is There A Change In The Wind? - The-looser-it-s-me


People don’t like being forced to purchase things they may not want, which is why over half of us are hoping that the Supreme Court throws out the individual insurance mandate in President Barack Obama’s health care plan.
There’s also a worldwide rebellion brewing against being forced to purchase expensive electricity produced by so-called “renewable” sources, now being exacerbated by the availability of very cheap natural gas from shale formations.
But, here in the U.S. there are some 30 different statewide “renewable portfolio standards” (RPSs) that also mandate pricey power, usually under the guise of fighting dreaded global warming.

The Great Renewable Energy Scam: Is There A Change In The Wind?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/patrickmichaels/2012/01/19/the-great-renewable-energy-scam-is-there-a-change-in-the-wind/


People don’t like being forced to purchase things they may not want, which is why over half of us are hoping that the Supreme Court throws out the individual insurance mandate in President Barack Obama’s health care plan.
There’s also a worldwide rebellion brewing against being forced to purchase expensive electricity produced by so-called “renewable” sources, now being exacerbated by the availability of very cheap natural gas from shale formations.
But, here in the U.S. there are some 30 different statewide “renewable portfolio standards” (RPSs) that also mandate pricey power, usually under the guise of fighting dreaded global warming.
RPSs command that  a certain percentage of electricity has to come from wind, solar, geothermal, or biomass. Given that this power generally costs a lot more than what comes from a modern coal or gas plant, your local utility passes the cost on in the form of higher bills, which the various state utility commissions are only too happy to approve in the name of saving the planet.
RPSs generally do not include hydroelectric power, which produces no carbon dioxide. It’s also much more predictable than solar or wind, and costs about the same as the average for gas and coal combined. It’s not in the portfolio standards because dams are soooo 20th century, and it isn’t a darling of the green lobby, like solar, wind and biomass.  But hydro can deliver more juice than solar is ever likely to.
Nor do RPSs allow for natural gas. There are massive quantities in shale formations around the country, and new horizontal drilling techniques are releasing so much of it that it is now the cheapest source of electrical power.  If our environmentalist friends were at all serious about climate change, they would enthuse over it because  it produces significantly less carbon dioxide than an equivalent quantity of coal when used for power generation.  Instead, they are horrified that cheap gas will destroy solar and wind.
Their worries are quite well-founded.  In November, NextEra Energy, the country’s largest wind-energy producer, said it would develop no new wind projects this year, as utilities sell cheaper gas power.
When are governments going to learn that they ought to butt out of the energy business? RPSs that specify certain technologies are essentially picking winners and losers based more upon political pull than market logic.
One needs to look no further than ethanol as a motor fuel, mandated by the feds.  Sold as “renewable” and reducing pernicious carbon dioxide emissions, it actually produces more in its life cycle than simply burning an equivalent amount of gasoline.  It also—unconscionably—consumes 40% of U.S. corn production, and we are the by far the world’s largest producer of this important basic food.
The popular revulsion against ethanol has succeeded in cutting its massive federal subsidy, of $0.54 per gallon, which ran out on Dec. 31.  But that doesn’t stop the federal mandate.  Last year it was for roughly 14 billion gallons from corn and it will be nearly 15 billion in 2012. By 2022, up to 20 billion gallons will be required — all from corn — unless there is a breakthrough in so-called “cellulosic” ethanol, which, no matter how much money the government throws at it, hasn’t happened.  Indeed, the largest cellulosic plant, Range Fuels, in Camilla, Ga., just went bankrupt.  The loss to American taxpayers appears to be about $120 million, or about 25% of a Solyndra.

Don’t expect Congress to zero the ethanol mandate anytime soon. Farm country tends to be conservative on pretty much everything except propping up corn prices, which is what ethanol mandates do.
Having seen the ethanol debacle, will the states put solar and wind in their rightful (small) niches by repealing the RPSs? Increasing utility bills with renewable mandates is politically dangerous, and there is less and less political will to subsidize and otherwise prop up energy sources and technologies that cost too much.
Look for a movement in the many state legislatures that approved the outrageous RPSs without asking people how they liked being forced to buy something they don’t want. Or will cheaper natural gas and hydro be allowed in the standards in the place of wind and solar? There is likely to be some legislation introduced this year and a lot more in the future, as the U.S. catches on to the great renewable energy scam.

Tuesday, 23 October 2012

Crown Capital Management: Economic Crisis Casts Shadow Over Biodiversity Tal...

Crown Capital Management: Economic Crisis Casts Shadow Over Biodiversity Tal...: http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/business/economic-crisis-casts-shadow-over-biodiversity-talks/551489 The global economic crisis cast its ...

Economic Crisis Casts Shadow Over Biodiversity Talks - The-looser-it-s-me

Economic Crisis Casts Shadow Over Biodiversity Talks - The-looser-it-s-me

The global economic crisis cast its shadow over UN talks that closed in India on Saturday after two weeks of intense wrangling on funding to reverse the decline of Earth’s natural resources.

A deal was finally signed a day later than planned, after a succession of late-night sessions that pitted rich countries reticent to fork out more cash as they try to balance the books, against poor ones.

Several traditional donor countries cited the world’s economic troubles as a factor in the talks, held under the auspices of the UN’s Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

“Countries like us in difficult financial times are making big sacrifices with taxpayers’ money. We want to make sure... that we are not leaving ourselves open to putting greater burden on our taxpayers,” British Environment Minister Richard Benyon told AFP on the penultimate day of the negotiations.

Economic Crisis Casts Shadow Over Biodiversity Talks | andrewmac0 | Social Bookmarking .Net

Economic Crisis Casts Shadow Over Biodiversity Talks | andrewmac0 | Social Bookmarking .Net
The global economic crisis cast its shadow over UN talks that closed in India on Saturday after two weeks of intense wrangling on funding to reverse the decline of Earth’s natural resources.

A deal was finally signed a day later than planned, after a succession of late-night sessions that pitted rich countries reticent to fork out more cash as they try to balance the books, against poor ones.

Several traditional donor countries cited the world’s economic troubles as a factor in the talks, held under the auspices of the UN’s Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

“Countries like us in difficult financial times are making big sacrifices with taxpayers’ money. We want to make sure... that we are not leaving ourselves open to putting greater burden on our taxpayers,” British Environment Minister Richard Benyon told AFP on the penultimate day of the negotiations.

Economic Crisis Casts Shadow Over Biodiversity Talks

http://www.thejakartaglobe.com/business/economic-crisis-casts-shadow-over-biodiversity-talks/551489


The global economic crisis cast its shadow over UN talks that closed in India on Saturday after two weeks of intense wrangling on funding to reverse the decline of Earth’s natural resources.

A deal was finally signed a day later than planned, after a succession of late-night sessions that pitted rich countries reticent to fork out more cash as they try to balance the books, against poor ones.
Several traditional donor countries cited the world’s economic troubles as a factor in the talks, held under the auspices of the UN’s Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

“Countries like us in difficult financial times are making big sacrifices with taxpayers’ money. We want to make sure... that we are not leaving ourselves open to putting greater burden on our taxpayers,” British Environment Minister Richard Benyon told AFP on the penultimate day of the negotiations.
In the end, the deadlock was broken and developed states pledged to double by 2015 the aid they provide to poor countries for biodiversity projects, compared to a baseline of average annual aid in the period 2006-2010.

No figures were mentioned, but observer groups believed the new annual figure would amount to about $10 billion (8 billion euros) per year — just 10 percent of what global consumers spent on chocolate last year.
Some negotiators, especially in the European Union, hailed the deal as a symbolic breakthrough in tough times.

“In the context of the financial crisis, this is a good deal,” French Environment Minister Delphine Batho told AFP.
Yet CBD member countries lamented that “the lack of sufficient financial resources” was hampering progress on biodiversity, urging one another to “consider all possible sources and means that can help to meet the level of resources needed”.
Many observers believe the pledge is not nearly enough, and warned a failure to pay up now could spell disaster.

“Efforts to conserve nature must be urgently scaled up if we want to meet the 2020 deadline to save all life on Earth,” the International Union for Conservation of Nature said.
Earlier in the week, the union had added 400 animals and plants to its authoritative “Red List” of species at risk of extinction.
A quarter of the world’s mammals, 13 percent of birds, 41 percent of amphibians and 33 percent of reef-building corals are now at risk of dying out, according to the list.

“If we do not invest in nature now, the cost will be tremendous in terms of the loss of our global biodiversity and the vital ecosystem services it provides for humanity,” said Conservation International biodiversity head Lina Barrera.
Conservation group WWF said about $200 billion must be invested in biodiversity annually if the world is to meet the targets it set two years ago to turn back the loss of species and habitat that humans rely on for food, water and livelihoods.
“What’s been agreed in Hyderabad represents less than half this number.”
Environment talks in Rio de Janeiro in June and a succession of UN climate conferences have been marked by a failure to meet funding targets.

“We have a global economic crisis that is of course more urgent in Europe than anywhere else, and Europe has always been the leading political bloc in these negotiations,” WWF executive director for conservation Lasse Gustavsson, told AFP.

“Environment negotiations have always been orchestrated by the EU. It is not happening here and it was not happening in Rio.”

UN Environment Program executive director Achim Steiner said economic woes had affected the global commitment to solving the planet’s ills, “which risks eroding the ability of nations to act collectively in addressing fundamental environmental challenges”.
Yet “the incentives to invest — both economic and environmental — are clearer than ever”, he said.
The economic crisis hit at a time that environment issues were starting to gain serious ground on the global agenda.While the environment, global warming and biodiversity may not have been completely abandoned, observers feel things have not moved as quickly as they should have.
Countries decided at the last CBD conference in Nagoya, Japan, two years ago on an ambitious 20-point plan to turn back the tide of biodiversity depletion by 2020.The so-called Aichi Biodiversity Targets include halving the rate of habitat loss, expanding water and land areas under conservation, preventing the extinction of species on the threatened list, and restoring at least 15 percent of degraded ecosystems.
But the plan has been hamstrung by a lack of cash for conservation, research, and the creation of green business alternatives.
“The need for the world’s nations to come together to implement the Aichi Targets grows more pressing with widespread extinction increasing every year,” said Conservation International president Russell Mittermeier.

Wednesday, 10 October 2012

Crown Capital Management: crown capital management l A solution for Asian ca...

Crown Capital Management: crown capital management l A solution for Asian ca...: http://blog.crowncapitalmngt.com/a-solution-for-asian-carp-infestation/ crown capital management Brought from the East to aid in man...

crown capital management l A solution for Asian carp infestation

http://blog.crowncapitalmngt.com/a-solution-for-asian-carp-infestation/


crown capital management

Brought from the East to aid in managing aquatic plants in aquaculture industries, Asian carp has been unwittingly introduced to freshwater sources of the US. Today, they are seen as a big problem in the fishing industry for their big appetite and fast breeding, overshadowing other fish for space and food in lakes.
Asian carp presence has been recorded in around 18 states and are already established in the areas of Missouri and Illinois. The fish threatening to mess with the USD 7 billion sport and commercial fishing industry of the Great Lakes can grow up to 100 pounds and measure over 4 feet.
Some are saying that the easy solution for this is closing the canal systems and any other point of entry of asian carps. However, such a step will certainly cost billions, not only in construction but also in lost profit from boat traffic that uses the canal system.
Last resort options to prevent upsetting the marine biodiversity in the Great Lakes are harmful to other industries and would also worsen the road traffic, ergo an increase in carbon emissions.
The Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework of the government is set to allocate USD 51.5 billion to protect the Great Lakes from the asian carp infestation. This program apparently involves methods to kill or drive them away, from poison pellets to soundwave-shooting underwater guns.
A more permanent and beneficial solution seems to be to catch the asian carps and turn them into foodstuffs like what Schafer Fisheries in Illinois is doing. Schafer has been selling 10 million lbs of asian carp across the world, satisfying a demand for them in other parts of the world while helping their locality get rid of a major headache. Asian carps can be processed into food products like sausage, jerk, hotdogs and can also be included in fertilizers. Even if this one industry will not be enough to totally stop the proliferation of Asian carp, it can at least be a major step in finding a solution.
Asian carp is a collective term for several species of carp: grass carp, black carp, silver carp and bighead carp.

crown capital management